Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive



  • Is that possible to double the footpads to avoid nosedive or put something on it to be sure never the board lost contact with shoes when is working...



  • @charge360

    You seem so focused on mechanical failures due to footpad sensor issues, but I'd really like to see a video of you riding your Onewheel because I can almost guarantee it's user error and has nothing to do with the workmanship of the board.

    If someone skateboarding for the first time dropped in on a 15' vert ramp and ruptured their appendix, I don't think they could blame the makers of the skateboard. The Onewheel takes skill to ride, and you have to learn the proper technique before attempting to ride fast. And wear pads, man!

    If you honestly think there's something wrong with your board, then you should just send it in for maintenance, because I don't understand how you can watch a video like this and think that it's the board at fault and not something you might be doing wrong:
    http://youtu.be/ux6_diA14jk



  • @thegreck said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    @charge360

    You seem so focused on mechanical failures due to footpad sensor issues, but I'd really like to see a video of you riding your Onewheel because I can almost guarantee it's user error and has nothing to do with the workmanship of the board.

    If someone skateboarding for the first time dropped in on a 15' vert ramp and ruptured their appendix, I don't think they could blame the makers of the skateboard. The Onewheel takes skill to ride, and you have to learn the proper technique before attempting to ride fast. And wear pads, man!

    If you honestly think there's something wrong with your board, then you should just send it in for maintenance, because I don't understand how you can watch a video like this and think that it's the board at fault and not something you might be doing wrong:
    http://youtu.be/ux6_diA14jk

    OT: Mike Tavares makes some really awesome videos.
    Charge, I agree with thegreck, but as some on here have pointed out, the sensor is actually very narrow within the pad area. That means you need to keep at leas one part of your foot in the middle of the blue section after you've started and both as you begin.

    I have been fortunate in that I have only had one nose dive, and it was while I was in Classic mode. I've since switched to Extreme mode, as most on here will also tell you to do.

    Another reason people have said that they've done a nose dive is because their weight is too far forward rather than being balanced over the board.

    With all of this said, I don't know if you've had problems with nose dives or if your post is just pondering about making the OW failproof, so maybe I'm not helping at all...



  • @thegreck Mike T is the BOSS ! He's got awesome style!
    https://youtu.be/3WpGqiDLXg0
    @charge360 I was rewatching this vid'
    https://youtu.be/AGAmlNwn62U
    And suddenly thinking about you :)
    Fucking board powered down on its own!



  • @charge360 I contacted future motion and asked if I could add another sensor to the back and they said it would not work.. I was debating on buying one and just trying it myself..



  • @hekkubus said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    @thegreck said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    @charge360

    You seem so focused on mechanical failures due to footpad sensor issues, but I'd really like to see a video of you riding your Onewheel because I can almost guarantee it's user error and has nothing to do with the workmanship of the board.

    If someone skateboarding for the first time dropped in on a 15' vert ramp and ruptured their appendix, I don't think they could blame the makers of the skateboard. The Onewheel takes skill to ride, and you have to learn the proper technique before attempting to ride fast. And wear pads, man!

    If you honestly think there's something wrong with your board, then you should just send it in for maintenance, because I don't understand how you can watch a video like this and think that it's the board at fault and not something you might be doing wrong:
    http://youtu.be/ux6_diA14jk

    Charge, I agree with thegreck, but as some on here have pointed out, the sensor is actually very narrow within the pad area. That means you need to keep at least one part of your foot in the middle of the blue section after you've started and both as you begin.

    I would think the pressure sensors being a small area right in the center is actually a benefit, because it allows more flexibility of movement of your feet, just as long as part of your foot is over the center area you should be fine. If the sensors were as big as the blue areas on the grip tape and also required your foot to cover them, you would have to keep your foot completely locked in place or risk nosediving. It would also make dismounting much more difficult if you had to clear your foot of a bigger area to do so.

    Another reason people have said that they've done a nose dive is because their weight is too far forward rather than being balanced over the board.

    Exactly.

    With all of this said, I don't know if you've had problems with nose dives or if your post is just pondering about making the OW failproof...

    If you click his name and check out his past 50 posts, you'll get your answer, haha.



  • @fabuz said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    @thegreck Mike T is the BOSS ! He's got awesome style!
    https://youtu.be/3WpGqiDLXg0
    @charge360 I was rewatching this vid'
    https://youtu.be/AGAmlNwn62U
    And suddenly thinking about you :)
    Fucking board powered down on its own!

    Mine did he other day, and I was pretty mad. Turns out that the last time I used it I thought that I charged it, and I really didn't. That one was user error for sure. However, I'm willing to assume that there are times when the board cuts off for other reasons.



  • @hekkubus yah right! All was wrong :)
    Front foot placement + inertia ;)



  • There are two separate and distinct causes of nosedive that keep getting conflated, one is simply leaning too far forward and overpowering the motor, which seems most likely to happen when going up hill and in classic mode, but in any event probably won't happen to anyone after they've gotten a ways up the learning curve. The other cause, however, which is not so easily addressed, is losing contact with the front foot pad sensor from an inadvertent foot lift, and might even be more likely to happen to experienced skateboarders with years of doing this unconsciously. I ride probably as much as anybody and would happily pay a huge premium for a two (front and back footpad) sensor version of the board that kicks when you're moving fast, just for the peace of mind, and my guess is it will come. If you look at pretty much any gear related sport, the more expensive extra safety feature stuff always starts getting layered on over time. Its not keeping me from riding now, but it is going to keep out some which might even be for the best, but in any event I Iook forward to it like all the other advances that make things more accessible to the masses from climbing gear to mountain bikes, to kiteboard gear to longboards to backcountry ski gear, to wakeboards and wakeboats and paragliders and skimboards and sea kayaks and sup boards etc etc etc...



  • @SeaP90d Yeah, it's a tough problem to fix. The reason the sensors are even there is so that the board knows someone is riding, and when you jump or fall off, the board doesn't keep going until it hits something or runs out of juice.

    They have to be easy enough to cover with your foot, but at the same time easy to take your foot off so that you don't kill yourself trying to dismount.

    The added second sensor was FM's attempt to remedy the situation, so that once you get going all you have to do is keep ONE of them covered. The original prototype had a single physical button that you had to keep pressed down with your toe... imagine how many nosedives there would be if they went with that design for the final version!



  • I'm just spit balling ideas here:

    Board already has active Bluetooth, how about an optional deadman''s switch that can be held like electric skateboards are doing as their primary controller. Hold switch and board remains active. No accidental stoppages! If either foot pads or switch says, "Go", just keep active. Liability is on rider to let go in event of fall. I don't imagine firmware is looking on Bluetooth for input about foot pads (but surely could be programmed in), but I have some other ideas that are already present in the data stream as can be seen by Kwatt's app. Not to used for controlling speed, but what are other options that would be nice to have on a rapidly available switch with a lanyard so it cant get dropped like a cellphone while riding?

    *About to hit a hill? Switch to elevated mode for more nose clearance.
    *If the leds were individually addressed, turn signals would be neat.

    How about a means on the remote to detail battery power, like a color changing Led. Battery under 10%? A vibrator and an optional beeper to physically indicate to operator.

    This remote could remove the need for apps outside of firmware updates, and solve other issues that have been mentioned with what would be a pretty simple device.



  • @Oversoul225 I've only been riding 6 weeks, but I agree with all of these ideas. In the case of the deadman's switch, when the rider releases it, the board can check the footpads as a secondary safety measure.



  • @SeaP90d said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    There are two separate and distinct causes of nosedive that keep getting conflated, one is simply leaning too far forward and overpowering the motor, which seems most likely to happen when going up hill and in classic mode, but in any event probably won't happen to anyone after they've gotten a ways up the learning curve. The other cause, however, which is not so easily addressed, is losing contact with the front foot pad sensor from an inadvertent foot lift, and might even be more likely to happen to experienced skateboarders with years of doing this unconsciously. I ride probably as much as anybody and would happily pay a huge premium for a two (front and back footpad) sensor version of the board that kicks when you're moving fast, just for the peace of mind, and my guess is it will come. If you look at pretty much any gear related sport, the more expensive extra safety feature stuff always starts getting layered on over time. Its not keeping me from riding now, but it is going to keep out some which might even be for the best, but in any event I Iook forward to it like all the other advances that make things more accessible to the masses from climbing gear to mountain bikes, to kiteboard gear to longboards to backcountry ski gear, to wakeboards and wakeboats and paragliders and skimboards and sea kayaks and sup boards etc etc etc...

    From everything I can gather, the first reason is why I fell. Was going up a hill on our local walking track and may have leaned too far. It worried me because I had no warning or pushback, so for a while I've questioned whether or not the thing just cut out on me.

    I wonder if the backfoot sensor could be the recessive sensor that only works after the dominant (front-foot sensor) has been engaged on both parts.



  • @hekkubus Pushback only happens when you're moving too fast or your battery is about to die, and you have to be properly balanced on the board with your center of gravity over the wheel for pushback to even work. Leaning too far forward makes it impossible for the wheel to compensate for your weight, which causes the nose to hit the ground. And since the board is attempting to keep up with you by increasing your speed, it can be dangerous because the wheel is spinning faster, but the nose is digging into the ground.

    It's a failure of the system due to putting too much weight too quickly on the front, and nothing can be done when the system fails. It's just something you have to be aware of and be careful not to do.



  • @thegreck said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    @hekkubus Pushback only happens when you're moving too fast or your battery is about to die, and you have to be properly balanced on the board with your center of gravity over the wheel for pushback to even work. Leaning too far forward makes it impossible for the wheel to compensate for your weight, which causes the nose to hit the ground. And since the board is attempting to keep up with you by increasing your speed, it can be dangerous because the wheel is spinning faster, but the nose is digging into the ground.

    It's a failure of the system due to putting too much weight too quickly on the front, and nothing can be done when the system fails. It's just something you have to be aware of and be careful not to do.

    Yeah, I'm pretty sure that when I did a face plant on the asphalt, that's the reason it happened. I since have been more wary of staying balanced.



  • I think ultimately the boards could shut off on their own with no warning, but I fully believe that most cases are user error. I have been fortunate to not have had another nose dive (not counting where I've hit roots, pot holes in the yard, etc.), but I think that as I've gotten better at boarding, I am able to adjust to the conditions that could cause trouble.



  • @hekkubus said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    I think ultimately the boards could shut off on their own with no warning

    That's scary. A couple of times my board has shut off when I was standing still on it, but I wasn't completely sure it wasn't because I took pressure off the sensors, and since I was stopped, maybe it thought I was trying to dismount? But yeah, scary to think of that happening when I'm riding at speed.



  • Occasionally the board cuts out on me when I'm stopped or just getting started. I believe it's my foot not actually pressing down both sensors, and I have to actively try to distribute my weight on my foot to press down both of them when I start. Which also leads me to believe I probably ride most the time with only one sensor being pressed, but I've never had a problem with the board shutting off while moving.



  • @WyvernKing That's exactly what I think is happening to me as well. I'm probably lifting my toe to readjust when I'm standing still, and the board goes into dismount mode. Luckily this doesn't happen when you're going over .5mph or I'd probably be nosediving a lot.



  • I think many of these issues are solved by riding with the sensor on the back foot rather than the front. When your foot loses sensor contact, most of the time it's the front foot, whereas my rear foot stays glued to the board.


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