Ghost rider.



  • Okay we just got the OneWheel six days ago and we have discovered a ghost rider (among other things).
    My son experienced a moment where the board continued to accelerate after a nosedive wipeout.
    He was going up a hill nosedived and slid completely off the board consequently the OW bounced backwards, then the board with nobody on continued to accelerate under motor power . It wasn't fast but definitely sounded like someone were on it. I witnessed it all.

    My thoughts are that the board should have halted operation with no pressure on front pads.

    Could it be that the sound was the regen?

    It was traveling 15-20 feet before my boy caught up to it.

    Could it be faulty sensor pads?
    Since we got it we had quite a few wipeouts.

    Anyone got answers,
    Thanks



  • I've said this a few times and still feel that a physical cut-off tether, would be ideal for "run-aways". A simply cuff bound to a short cord (think surfboard tether) with a phono plug or similar to the board and if you lose the boar, plug get's pulled, removing connection between battery and motor.

    Like on a jetski, for instance.



  • @fruitygreen: I have riden like about 7 boards (3 that I have owned so far, plus the ones from friends) so far and only 2 of them regulary didn´t stop immediately when jumping of. It seems like on some boards the sensors on the footbad are reacting sluggish when deattaching...fortunately none of my boards do have that behaviour. I would try to change the footpads...



  • @cr4p My OW is barely a week old. I dont think I should be replacing anything.
    It cost me ($1500) and I expect it to last way longer than 6 days.
    Sounds like this could be a glitch of some sort though. I'll keep this in mind hoping it is not absolutely true.

    Thanks.



  • @fruitygreen when the board is quite new, the sensors tend to stick sometimes, it will change over time. probably within few weeks of riding it will react as it should :) I noticed this behaviour on my 2 OW :)



  • @fruitygreen Just because somehing seems expensive doesn't mean that nothing can be wrong with it. Part of the $1,500 price of your Onewheel is a complete one-year warranty. If the sensors are faulty (which it sounds like they are), it could be very dangerous to the rider or people (or cars) around them. Replacing them wouldn't cost you anything since it's still under warranty, so you should contact support and let them decide. They might just send you new footpads you can replace yourself.



  • @thegreck said in Ghost rider.:

    @fruitygreen Just because somehing seems expensive doesn't mean that nothing can be wrong with it. Part of the $1,500 price of your Onewheel is a complete one-year warranty. If the sensors are faulty (which it sounds like they are), it could be very dangerous to the rider or people (or cars) around them.

    I agree with you. But I'm sensing it's a common occurence we cannot just excuse.

    . Replacing them wouldn't cost you anything since it's still under warranty, so you should contact support and let them decide. They might just send you new footpads you can replace yourself.

    I think it will still cost me. Shipping to Hawaii always cost something..

    Thanks



  • I had similar problems when I was first starting out. The day I got mine I noticed similar behavior when I bailed off while in motion. At one point it scooted off a good 15 ft. and got stuck under the rear axle of a truck in my driveway. I had to deflate the tire to dislodge it. I was really concerned, but not convinced, that it had a problem. It turns out, mine didn't have a problem in that regard. It's a feature not a bug that deactivating both sensors while the device is in motion doesn't immediately shut the motor down.

    I'm just going to speculate here, but I would be willing to bet that since your son was going uphill he likely buried the front end accelerating too heavily. This will cause the rider to crash, but will not necessarily cause the OneWheel to detect CRASH_STATE because the nose grounded out at an angle above the level enough that the board had no way of knowing if the rider had crashed into a hill or if s/he was accelerating aggressively on a level surface and momentarily came off the sensors from a bump. Whenever I have overrun the motor on level ground and "nose dived" my OneWheel has always stopped in it's tracks while my person continued on it's way to the scene of the accident.

    As your riding ability advances and you explore terrain beyond level pavement, there will be times when coming off both sensors for less than a second is unavoidable. Going over a slightly rough patch at speed can be enough to cause your feet to chatter off the board momentarily. You definitely don't want the motor shutting down in these situations.

    I think it's pretty important to absolutely avoid crowded pedestrian areas and riding close to traffic until you are able to ride in complete control of the board, or at least are always ready to swoop down to scoop it off the ground when you bail.

    Now if you can get the thing to scoot away from you for more than a full second after jumping off, you may have a problem. Like you said, shipping to/from Hawaii isn't cheap, so you may want to experiment with bailing off in an open area to see if you can reliably reproduce troubling behavior. I'm sure the software's rider detection algorithms will improve in time, but for now new riders just have to deal with the current limitations.



  • @bmtka So it could be a programmed feature we encountered?
    Now then I am thinking they should add a loud horn to signal anyone about a possible runaway. It could aid the rider or at least give some feedback.

    Thanks for the knowledge.



  • @fruitygreen Yes, the motor does stay engaged for the count of one-Mississippi after pressure comes off the sensors. This is so that if you hit a bump while riding and go weightless for a brief moment, you can continue riding.

    But like @bmtka said, if the motor was fully engaged when the rider came off (nose diving while going uphill, for example), then the OW could speed off during that one-Mississippi count (thinking you might still be onboard) before shutting down. This would be standard operating procedure and not a faulty sensor.



  • @cr4p

    Only two?



  • @dalisdair
    yes, the other 5 boards worked as I expected them to do when jumping off



  • @cr4p

    Nice!



  • @fruitygreen said in Ghost rider.:

    My son experienced a moment where the board continued to accelerate after a nosedive wipeout.
    My thoughts are that the board should have halted operation with no pressure on front pads.

    Not faulty, just has a delay associated with it. Essentially you are leaning over hard in acceleration and it will continue to accelerate for a second or so after you detach. You can recreate this by nosediving it really fast on carpet .


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