Overcharge is some stone age bullshit



  • Probably about half the time I ride my Plus I run into this crap. If you have a long stretch of uphill to ride, it's all good, but the goddamn thing stays at "100%" for a pretty significant stretch, so if I've only got a little bit of uphill or flat ground available, I have to walk the thing down the slope until I can ride it. I initially thought this would be a pretty minor setback, but... it's not. On the west coast we've got loads of mountains, and clear from California to Washington I've had constant frustrations with overcharge. Ride uphill... still 100%, still getting pushback. Ride uphill some more... still 100%, still getting overcharge warnings. Sometimes I just get annoyed and go home.

    I don't have a single other battery-powered piece of electronic equipment that has to worry about overcharge. The battery and the motor are entirely separate components - why not cut off throughput to the battery at 98%? Would this also cut off power FROM the battery to the motor due to design limitations? I'm struggling to believe such a limitation is reasonable in a $1500 product in 2017.

    This problem would be a lot less frustrating if the app was capable of getting an accurate reading most of the time. I try not to charge to 100%, but the app tends to get stuck at "80%" or something, even if I disconnect and reconnect, and then before I know it, the damn thing has charged to 100. And then I'm trying to find some way down a hill and cursing FM as I carry my OneWheel the whole way.

    I suppose this doesn't bother folks in the midwest so much.



  • You may want to delete the App completely and then reinstall it to see if it helps with accuracy.



  • @T-CAT Thanks, I'll give that a shot.



  • Something's wrong. I have a +, live on top of a hill and always manage to burn off 8% or with an extra trip around the block before I descend. I love the Onewheel, but it reminds me a little bit of an old Fiat--minor variations from board to board it seems.



  • @shattle said in Overcharge is some stone age bullshit:

    Something's wrong. I have a +, live on top of a hill and always manage to burn off 8% or with an extra trip around the block before I descend. I love the Onewheel, but it reminds me a little bit of an old Fiat--minor variations from board to board it seems.

    hmm, good to know. Maybe I should actually contact FM directly. I'd seen some similar complaints so I just assumed everyone had this problem.



  • This post is deleted!


  • Sounds like you need to run your battery down as close as you can to zero and charge for 48 hours. My original one stayed at 100% for 2 miles and died at around 25% battery but a few cycles of draining and long recharges solved the issue.



  • @ZeeMox I agree. I have a Bamboo GT and it has the same issue with braking on a full charge. I know a little bit about electronics, just enough to make myself sound dumb, but enough to know that building something in that stops regen current from reaching the battery if battery is at x% shouldn't be that difficult for someone who really knows what they are doing. Seems like all the brains are in the front and the ass end of the circuit acts like a dumb mechanical connection. They need to make these things work like this : IF battery charge >= xx% - Use Dynamic braking - ELSE IF battery charge <= xx% Use Regen Braking. Maybe they can't because of the heat generated, but its def possible. See below

    This was from a site but the link got flagged as spam for some reason:

    There are three ways a cart(Onewheel) can be designed to handle a downhill:

    Coasting.
    The motor is disconnected and left floating. There is no braking effect from the motor and the cart will accelerate so to accumulate the maximum kinetic energy to help with the next uphill climb.
    Dynamic braking
    The motor is detached from the battery and connected to a resistor. The potential energy lost downhill is dissipated as heat. The motor acts as a brake but the energy is lost as heat.
    Regenerative braking
    The motor stays connected to the battery and the CEMF (once exceeding the battery) will recharge the battery. The motor acts as a brake and the lost potential energy is stored in the battery.


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