Traveling with Onewheel. There's hope.



  • Looks like more and more people are able to fly with Onewheel.
    Some on FB group made it to Hawaii with no problem.

    Would be nice to share info, like how to get lettre from TSA,
    or something to the effect.

    My vacation is coming up soon and would love to haul my OW along.



  • If you are in the Facebook group, search for "TSA" and you'll find some posts from Robert Schramm. He put this note in his suitcase with his OW and made it from Chicago to Germany.

    https://lookaside.fbsbx.com/file/Dear TSA and Lufthansa.pdf?token=AWzZzoXN97jeZyYg8T04casav_ZqfJqQ0mVRuBxM3b8H4GeC-Rc6yXm1YPgWzEhBQW1EJDL81Ch264XLY-S3N95eHVQcPJStM9He6w-BhErkdnuMek2Wx_F17HOgiHVjAT0-_aSGspgVY_UWRZkUKLSAiT-QFImgh1u0khkiIsA2Rg



  • @skyman88

    Thank you.
    It's good to have the info here as well.



  • @sonny123 Actually you should go to the Facebook group, at the top go to Group Info, then Files. There is a data sheet on the battery and a Word and PDF copy of the letter a few folks have successfully used.



  • I was able to open it.



  • @skyman88

    Oh wait. There's more documents here.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/onewheelownersgroup/files/

    Thanks



  • @sonny123 thats it! I'm on my phone and couldn't get that link to show up correctly.

    Handful of people have been able to travel using this approach.



  • Can someone post the documentation for the (albeit small) group of people who don't have Facebook, like myself? Thanks!!



  • @miketech Does this link work?
    http://bit.ly/2rUOqMY



  • @thegreck said in Traveling with Onewheel. There's hope.:

    Does this link work?
    http://bit.ly/2rUOqMY

    yes, thank you!



  • @thegreck said in Traveling with Onewheel. There's hope.:

    @miketech Does this link work?
    http://bit.ly/2rUOqMY

    that is a great document
    thanks for sharing it with us



  • It's a very good idea but it is still lottery to me, as it is a self declaration.

    I understand most companies actually look for guidance from the IATA which emitted classification as dangerous goods small powered vehicules:
    http://www.iata.org/whatwedo/cargo/dgr/Documents/lithium-battery-vehicles-cargo.pdf

    I guess we fall in the "UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries
    contained in equipment".

    Of course we suffer from those hoverboards in fire using the "dangerous type" of Lithium Ion. But from what i read IATA apply no distinction whether it is LifePO4 or others lithium ion: they all fall under Lithium Ion. I hope I am wrong but I found nothing.

    It might be another story if we could remove the battery. I would definitly do it for my upcoming flight in 2 days to DC. But i had no guaranty from the company.

    We could hope for a better future, but recent moves about onboard laptops are not really paving the way....



  • @arnlej

    Yep, still hit or miss.
    0_1496695156903_18921650_10155146696761413_4236168119033080099_n.jpg



  • Flying tonight

    I just disassembled everything as in the video "Onewheel ready to fly" from Pascal Müller https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDXiJymb6N4

    It would have taken only 10 minutes if some screws were not difficult to remove... maybe damaged from a previous maintenance. And I dont know why for me the motor connector was impossible to remove without breaking a piece of plastic. I will have to put some glue. Sad.

    Now what to do with the battery pack...It is definitely a carry on, but should i open the box so the security can check what is written on the cells ?



  • @arnlej

    Why not just remove the battery?



  • @arnlej

    I guess we fall in the "UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries
    contained in equipment".

    Of course we suffer from those hoverboards in fire using the "dangerous type" of Lithium Ion. But from what i read IATA apply no distinction whether it is LifePO4 or others lithium ion: they all fall under Lithium Ion. I hope I am wrong but I found nothing.

    The reasoning is lame but is par for the course in blanket restrictions. Just like H2O is not the same as Hydrogen or other compounds containing Hydrogen, LifePO4 shouldn't be treated the same as the exploding batteries but it will take time for regulations to catch up with technology.



  • @sonny123 said in Traveling with Onewheel. There's hope.:

    @arnlej

    Why not just remove the battery?

    I have no idea how to remove it or what's involved, so that would be my answer to "why not." But if the battery is what they're scared of, then they wouldn't let you on with the battery either, removed or not. Or do you mean ship it?



  • @thegreck

    I think the battery can be removed without having to disassemble the whole thing.

    But you're right, if the battery is the issue, makes no difference unless they'll ship it, then why disassemble the whole thing.

    If I were to fly with it, I'd remove the wheel, a 5 minute process.
    Place the board flat in a suitcase with that TSA note
    and carry the wheel as a carry on.

    The flat board may look less threatening to them.
    I'd put a tripod along with some BS camera stuff to look commercial.



  • My (likely wrong) read is that we could remove the battery. Check the Onewheel. Carry the battery in our carry-on. I gleaned this from:

    https://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/hazmat_safety/more_info/?hazmat=7

    Relevant section:

    Spare (uninstalled) lithium ion and lithium metal batteries must be carried in carry-on baggage only. When a carry-on bag is checked at the gate or at planeside, all spare lithium batteries must be removed from the bag and kept with the passenger in the aircraft cabin. The battery terminals must be protected from short circuit.

    Size limits: Lithium metal (non-rechargeable) batteries are limited to 2 grams of lithium per battery. Lithium ion (rechargeable) batteries are limited to a rating of 100 watt hours (Wh) per battery. These limits allow for nearly all types of lithium batteries used by the average person in their electronic devices. With airline approval, passengers may also carry up to two spare larger lithium ion batteries (101-160 watt hours). This size covers the larger after-market extended-life laptop computer batteries and some larger batteries used in professional audio/visual equipment.



  • @lynnpreston I believe someone has done exactly this before. They used one of those EM shielded bags (like a hard drive comes in) to protect the battery in their carry on. Saw it on the FB group a while back if my memory is correct.



  • I landed in DC and reassembled the Onewheel in few minutes.
    It is such a fun productive and social tool to travel with - It opens a city like nothing !

    Few hours before boarding (Paris -> DC with a stop in Reykjavik) Icelandair emailed me that the OW will be accepted without its battery, but the battery will be refused.

    I then had a nice conversation with Future Motion support, they proposed me to send it for a repair in case my battery was confiscated (and charge me for tuning + missing part).

    So i took my chance and put the battery pack (not the battery module, too big and dirty) in a plastic bag as a carry on. It is a huge battery pack, I wasnt sure what to say if i was asked. But it was scanned without any question.

    Now I cross my finger it wont be confiscated on my way back !

    ps: to remove and extract the battery, you actually ends up only a few screws away from unmounting everyting. unmounting everything makes it easier to pack, and probably raises less security and custom questions. but i agree it is not a necessity.


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