Crash detection



  • Would it be possible to add some sort of pressure sensor to the bottom of the nose so the motor will stop turning when the nose is scraping the ground?

    Also, if a foot slips off a pad, will the motor quickly decelerate, stop suddenly or keep going? My friend had an accident and it seemed like it was trying to take off (rather than stop) when his foot slipped off.



  • @kohesion What do you think would be the benefit of the motor stopping when the nose hits the ground? The nose hits the ground when you've outrun the board, so you actually want it to speed up and get back under you.

    More experienced riders can usually lift the nose back up when it scrapes the ground, which is something they could never do if the board just suddenly stopped and powered off.



  • And which of your freind's feet slipped off? Because if he still had his front foot on the sensor, it's going to keep going until he takes it off. And either way, the board will keep going for the count of one Mississippi after your foot comes off both sensors when riding, which is a safety feature to keep people from crashing if they hit a bump and their weight comes off the sensors.



  • @thegreck that's useful to know.

    I figured there were probably reasons for the way the board behaves, I just wasn't sure what they were.



  • @kohesion They're still trying to improve and fine-tune the riding experience, but the engineers really thought of pretty much everything when they put this thing together, as far as making it as safe as a single-wheeled skateboard can be.



  • @thegreck said in Crash detection:

    @kohesion They're still trying to improve and fine-tune the riding experience, but the engineers really thought of pretty much everything when they put this thing together, as far as making it as safe as a single-wheeled skateboard can be.

    Not true.
    My board glitches often. After a crash and the board laying on its side, it continues to rev. It also runaway while upright with no rider on.

    If all safety scenarios have been thought of then, my board would not have these glitches. 25 pounds going at 10 mph could seriously hurt an individual, especially a child.

    I know we are not beyond having to prove glitches are happening , but I don't feel the need to post any proof.



  • @fruitygreen I meant all the normal programmed behaviors were well thought out, not the random glitches that are going to happen with any electronic device. Ever hear of a computer that never crashes? Those things can't be helped, but if they happen frequently you need to have it looked at and repaired.



  • @fruitygreen

    v1 or +? sounds like bad foot sensors.



  • @cascadewheeler It's a "+".

    Waiting for them to be available on the store.
    Last time we sent our board for repairs, it took over a month.

    Maybe things are different now, but FM left me with many doubts.



  • @thegreck said in Crash detection:

    @fruitygreen I meant all the normal programmed behaviors were well thought out, not the random glitches that are going to happen with any electronic device. Ever hear of a computer that never crashes? Those things can't be helped, but if they happen frequently you need to have it looked at and repaired.

    If there were an officially published reference guide to "normal programmed behaviours I would at the least try to understand what is an intended feature, and what's not. For now I believe I have a product that is not perfect.

    Regarding " a computer that never crashes", I once owned a solar powered calculator that never crashes except in dim light.

    There are are still lots of room for improvements in the OneWheel. Especially in safety.

    Crash detection can still even be implemented by observing roll/pitch angle in time. How long can a person ride a wall @90 degrees of roll? Not very long?
    So having my board revving while still on its side can be helped via programming even if footed sensors are faulty. Not unless there are no internal power cutoff mechanism.



  • @fruitygreen

    Well, Windows keeps improving although many people hated Windows 10.

    Unless they come up with a Onewheel that thinks for you, there'll always be some who won't like certain features.

    Point is, FM did a lot of thinking and covering plenty of angles from the get-go. There'll always be room for improvement.

    Look at Trotter. Pretty simple, straight shot design.
    That's about it.

    I don't think they'll ever come up with a firmware that'll please everyone.



  • @sonny123 said in Crash detection:

    @fruitygreen

    Well, Windows keeps improving although many people hated Windows 10.

    Unless they come up with a Onewheel that thinks for you, there'll always be some who won't like certain features.

    Point is, FM did a lot of thinking and covering plenty of angles from the get-go. There'll always be room for improvement.

    Look at Trotter. Pretty simple, straight shot design.
    That's about it.

    I don't think they'll ever come up with a firmware that'll please everyone.

    I think your drifting away from crash detection.



  • No matter what you do...a single wheeled board will never be as stable as a 4 wheeled longboard. Also guys, don't forget that FM advertise it as a board sport, which means that with any sport come some injuries...I'm also practising long distance pumping on longboard, had brocken the front truck while pumping, which result into a blue and purple hips these days...painful, boring, but hardware will always break from time to time, except if you want it to weight 4 times it's actual weight.



  • @fruitygreen

    Not really.
    I was talking in general and it's directly related to what was mentioned after the thread went off topic.

    Crash detection? It's already there under the name of push back. Riders who go past it do it at their own risk.

    Considering the amount on Onewheels out there, the percentage of boards needing service is at a minimal.

    This is directly credited to FM building a board in California rather than mass produced in China.

    There's no such thing as perfect board.
    But when you look at what pros are doing with these boards, that's pretty darn close.



  • @tartopom said in Crash detection:

    No matter what you do...a single wheeled board will never be as stable as a 4 wheeled longboard. Also guys, don't forget that FM advertise it as a board sport, which means that with any sport come some injuries...I'm also practising long distance pumping on longboard, had brocken the front truck while pumping, which result into a blue and purple hips these days...painful, boring, but hardware will always break from time to time, except if you want it to weight 4 times it's actual weight.

    Maybe kohesion the OP weren't referring to injuries associated with the lack of a crash detection system, but rather have a way to have the board cut power after a crash. Dunno but I do wish the board cuts off after a crash.



  • @fruitygreen I have a OW for more than 1y, and it always stopped after a crash...when the foot pad sensor is released. If your doesn't stop, then you have a faulty foot pad, nothing more.



  • @tartopom said in Crash detection:

    @fruitygreen I have a OW for more than 1y, and it always stopped after a crash...when the foot pad sensor is released. If your doesn't stop, then you have a faulty foot pad, nothing more.

    Are you aware of what more experienced riders are saying about the "normal operating features."?
    How the board continue to operate briefly during bumpy rides. So there are more to the footpads situation than most understands.

    Do you know or read what I have been writing here? I am not denying faulty footpads.



  • @fruitygreen yes I read that..."My board glitches often. After a crash and the board laying on its side, it continues to rev. It also runaway while upright with no rider on."
    and I don't agree..my board doesn't do that, that's why I think you just have a lazy footpad sensor. Basically, it happened a few times to me at beginning because the sensor was too sticky and remained engaged for few seconds, but it doesn't do that anymore since a long time. Also, when on the side, it stops to rev too..So what you have here is most probably a faulty pad sensor, not bad design because these case have been took into consideration by FM.



  • To answer the question about my friends crash...

    He lost his balance going less than 1mph and his back foot ended up on the ground which caused the board to rapidly accelerate. His front leg was still on the sensors so the board kept pushing on his right foot/leg for what seemed like a few seconds which over extended (or bent at wrong angle) his knee resulting in a torn LCL.



  • Ive wondered why the rear pad does not have sensors also just to keep that from happening. I have a nice scab on the inside of my front ankle from the tire doing a burnout against it...ouch. Coming from a skate/snowboard background...removing your front foot 1st just seems wrong and was hard to get used to after 25 years of taking off my back foot 1st LOL


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