Physics of heel turns



  • I'm watching a video of someone carving.

    For heel turns especially, it appears their center of gravity is significantly off or outside the board area.

    How does the physics work? Seems like they should fall off backwards.

    I am very cautious about keeping my center gravity over (or close to) the board. Maybe this is why I can't carve aggressively.



  • @kohesion Yes, that's a tough one to get the hang of for a lot of people, but it's the proper way to ride. Keep your weight centered over the wheel when riding straight, but lean into the turns. Otherwise, the centripetal force will throw you off balance and force you to take your turns more slowly.

    Think about when a motorcyclist is cornering, it's the same principle.



  • No physics, just practice ;) that was my hardest side for turns, now that's my favorite ;)



  • @kohesion I have a saying: lead with your body and the Onewheel will follow. I LOVE heel side turns- significantly more so than front side turns, because I can turn them a lot sharper and faster, and can really dip my whole body into them. The key is to compress down into the turn with a twisting motion, lean your body into the exit portion of the turn you want to take, while at the same time exerting enough force on the OW to keep it firmly underneath you (otherwise the board gets left behind and you go sailing).



  • For me, I came up with a mental image for where I wanted my body to be. So I think about sitting in a chair with the front two legs on the board. When I make a heel-side turn, I just sit down. After a while, I stopped thinking about it.



  • @thegreck said in Physics of heel turns:

    @kohesion Yes, that's a tough one to get the hang of for a lot of people, but it's the proper way to ride. Keep your weight centered over the wheel when riding straight, but lean into the turns. Otherwise, the centripetal force will throw you off balance and force you to take your turns more slowly.

    Think about when a motorcyclist is cornering, it's the same principle.

    For me I kinda put my weight ahead of the turn.
    One wheel is a lot more grippy than surfing.(Tail don't slide like a surfboard.)

    A motorcycles tire sidewall is heavily relied on when cornering. Alot of times you'll se a rider jump to one side putting their weight on the inside of the turn.

    The onewheel is funny and odd with a flat profile tire. I can make sharp turns in one direction by placing more weight on the turn side, but it gets wobbly when I make an opposite turn while foot is on the same location. I am trying to figure out a technique to work around the sensors.

    In my opinion foot placement also plays a role, but the grip tape is too gripping for making a lot of dynamic turns .


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