Quick Poll: Unexpected Nosedives



  • Hey guys, I cycle to work most days with my little dog in the basket and take the NYC subway when it's really wet. But since I tried a friend's electric skateboard of the holiday I've been on the look out for an electric commuter. I'm down on preorder for the XR as the range made it a feasible (12 mile round commute). I chose a OW over electric skateboard as I don't want to worry about bumps and weirdness in the road surface kicking me off. I'll still be carrying my 8lb dog on busy NYC streets and with that precious cargo, riding safely is the most important thing to me.

    Then I started reading about unexpected nosedives and they have got me feeling uneasy about the OW as my commuting solution.

    I've skated for years, ride a fixed gear bike almost every day so I know that if you push what these machines and your confidence is capable of too soon they can make you pay. I know a lot of nosedives are caused by user error, but I've seen a few reports of them happening without any warning. I know accidents can happen on anything that moves fast, but at least with an electric skateboard, if it cuts out it's easier to recover. So I'd love to get a feel for how often this sort of thing happens - have created a quick poll HERE

    Would appreciate any feedback!

    Cheers

    Roo



  • @roowilliams

    Learn and respect the boards ability prior to trying to commute. Pushback is the boards only warning that you’ve reach the peak speed it can safely keep you balanced. So if you keep the board under the 14-15 mph range, you should be good.

    I’ve riden in Boston on all the city terrain (old cobblestone, brick, manhole covers, etc...) and the board just eats it up.

    Also, the OW requires you to be engaged. Forget the marketing videos of people texting and eating a snack. It’s definitely in your best interest to pay full attention to the ride. My 17 mph nose dive was caused by a divet in the road that I did not see because I was looking at my Apple Watch to change songs on my BT speaker. I wasn’t ready when the board got unsettled and I ended up putting way too much weight on the front end while trying to get my balance back. Pay attention and enjoy the ride. There’s nothing like it.

    If you haven’t already, read all of this: https://onewheel.wiki/Riding_technique



  • @skyman88 thanks for the reply! I hadn’t seen the wiki so will have a good trawl through. Cheers.

    @skyman88 said in Quick Poll: Unexpected Nosedives:

    @roowilliams

    Learn and respect the boards ability prior to trying to commute. Pushback is the boards only warning that you’ve reach the peak speed it can safely keep you balanced. So if you keep the board under the 14-15 mph range, you should be good.

    I’ve riden in Boston on all the city terrain (old cobblestone, brick, manhole covers, etc...) and the board just eats it up.

    Also, the OW requires you to be engaged. Forget the marketing videos of people texting and eating a snack. It’s definitely in your best interest to pay full attention to the ride. My 17 mph nose dive was caused by a divet in the road that I did not see because I was looking at my Apple Watch to change songs on my BT speaker. I wasn’t ready when the board got unsettled and I ended up putting way too much weight on the front end while trying to get my balance back. Pay attention and enjoy the ride. There’s nothing like it.

    If you haven’t already, read all of this: https://onewheel.wiki/Riding_technique



  • I’d say ride (learn) 100miles on the OW before deciding whether you can commute carrying the dog.

    I think it is certainly possible.

    (Disclosure: I have only 128mi under my belt)



  • I personally waited 200km (130miles?) before I dared transporting my laptop in my backpack. I now have close to 4 times that under my belt, but i'm still extra careful when i'm carrying something fragile: take it easy, keep it simple, enjoy the ride...
    When i start getting too playful, falling (and rolling on my back) does (rightfully) happen. It wouldn't be fun if you got all the tricks on the first try. ^^

    For the record, i've never experienced any high-speed nosedive (my top speed is a safe 17mph). Since I'm experienced enough to understand what happens when I fall, I haven't had any unexplained nosedives of other sorts (i did have some).
    At first, I would crash and my mind would kind of blink and get back to consciousness when i'm on the ground; It would all happen in an instant and leave me with very few clues. As i got better, time started to slow down and my mind was better able to understand and react to a fall situation; Also, my reflexes got better, so my body starts reacting early, moving back the moment i fall and giving my brain more time to process and react.
    Anyway, my point is: nowadays when i fall, i always understand ultimately why. Even when i fall because of the board, it's because i hit a limit i knew about and should have avoided. For example, I fell on a tail-slide over-regeneration some days ago and the alarm started ringing when my ass was on the ground (perhaps there was a Bluetooth hick-up?). Still, totally my fault: new place, jumping fast down a steep hill with a full battery and braking hard when it gets steeper... Duh. What was I thinking? (I live on a hill, i battle with over regeneration everyday).



  • So far your poll is:

    • Yes: 9% (6)
    • No: 91% (59)

    If there is any bias in this poll, it's probably people blaming the board wrongly. I suspect careful examination of these 6 cases would prove some of them at least are user error.



  • I wasn't done with unexpected nosedives on my strong side (riding regular) until I had clocked >400 miles total. They were all my fault, even though each time I wanted to initially believe the board had malfunctioned. With experience I learned better.

    Now, knock-on-wood, it's been >800 miles since my last nosedive. Heed the warnings of others and take it serious, keep it 15mph max, but you don't need to ride paranoid and like squeeze the fun out of it. It's a very safe commuter machine if you pay attention and wear proper pads, signal properly in traffic, etc.


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