Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive



  • I'm just spit balling ideas here:

    Board already has active Bluetooth, how about an optional deadman''s switch that can be held like electric skateboards are doing as their primary controller. Hold switch and board remains active. No accidental stoppages! If either foot pads or switch says, "Go", just keep active. Liability is on rider to let go in event of fall. I don't imagine firmware is looking on Bluetooth for input about foot pads (but surely could be programmed in), but I have some other ideas that are already present in the data stream as can be seen by Kwatt's app. Not to used for controlling speed, but what are other options that would be nice to have on a rapidly available switch with a lanyard so it cant get dropped like a cellphone while riding?

    *About to hit a hill? Switch to elevated mode for more nose clearance.
    *If the leds were individually addressed, turn signals would be neat.

    How about a means on the remote to detail battery power, like a color changing Led. Battery under 10%? A vibrator and an optional beeper to physically indicate to operator.

    This remote could remove the need for apps outside of firmware updates, and solve other issues that have been mentioned with what would be a pretty simple device.



  • @Oversoul225 I've only been riding 6 weeks, but I agree with all of these ideas. In the case of the deadman's switch, when the rider releases it, the board can check the footpads as a secondary safety measure.



  • @SeaP90d said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    There are two separate and distinct causes of nosedive that keep getting conflated, one is simply leaning too far forward and overpowering the motor, which seems most likely to happen when going up hill and in classic mode, but in any event probably won't happen to anyone after they've gotten a ways up the learning curve. The other cause, however, which is not so easily addressed, is losing contact with the front foot pad sensor from an inadvertent foot lift, and might even be more likely to happen to experienced skateboarders with years of doing this unconsciously. I ride probably as much as anybody and would happily pay a huge premium for a two (front and back footpad) sensor version of the board that kicks when you're moving fast, just for the peace of mind, and my guess is it will come. If you look at pretty much any gear related sport, the more expensive extra safety feature stuff always starts getting layered on over time. Its not keeping me from riding now, but it is going to keep out some which might even be for the best, but in any event I Iook forward to it like all the other advances that make things more accessible to the masses from climbing gear to mountain bikes, to kiteboard gear to longboards to backcountry ski gear, to wakeboards and wakeboats and paragliders and skimboards and sea kayaks and sup boards etc etc etc...

    From everything I can gather, the first reason is why I fell. Was going up a hill on our local walking track and may have leaned too far. It worried me because I had no warning or pushback, so for a while I've questioned whether or not the thing just cut out on me.

    I wonder if the backfoot sensor could be the recessive sensor that only works after the dominant (front-foot sensor) has been engaged on both parts.



  • @hekkubus Pushback only happens when you're moving too fast or your battery is about to die, and you have to be properly balanced on the board with your center of gravity over the wheel for pushback to even work. Leaning too far forward makes it impossible for the wheel to compensate for your weight, which causes the nose to hit the ground. And since the board is attempting to keep up with you by increasing your speed, it can be dangerous because the wheel is spinning faster, but the nose is digging into the ground.

    It's a failure of the system due to putting too much weight too quickly on the front, and nothing can be done when the system fails. It's just something you have to be aware of and be careful not to do.



  • @thegreck said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    @hekkubus Pushback only happens when you're moving too fast or your battery is about to die, and you have to be properly balanced on the board with your center of gravity over the wheel for pushback to even work. Leaning too far forward makes it impossible for the wheel to compensate for your weight, which causes the nose to hit the ground. And since the board is attempting to keep up with you by increasing your speed, it can be dangerous because the wheel is spinning faster, but the nose is digging into the ground.

    It's a failure of the system due to putting too much weight too quickly on the front, and nothing can be done when the system fails. It's just something you have to be aware of and be careful not to do.

    Yeah, I'm pretty sure that when I did a face plant on the asphalt, that's the reason it happened. I since have been more wary of staying balanced.



  • I think ultimately the boards could shut off on their own with no warning, but I fully believe that most cases are user error. I have been fortunate to not have had another nose dive (not counting where I've hit roots, pot holes in the yard, etc.), but I think that as I've gotten better at boarding, I am able to adjust to the conditions that could cause trouble.



  • @hekkubus said in Double footpads or always at on avoid footpad lost nosedive:

    I think ultimately the boards could shut off on their own with no warning

    That's scary. A couple of times my board has shut off when I was standing still on it, but I wasn't completely sure it wasn't because I took pressure off the sensors, and since I was stopped, maybe it thought I was trying to dismount? But yeah, scary to think of that happening when I'm riding at speed.



  • Occasionally the board cuts out on me when I'm stopped or just getting started. I believe it's my foot not actually pressing down both sensors, and I have to actively try to distribute my weight on my foot to press down both of them when I start. Which also leads me to believe I probably ride most the time with only one sensor being pressed, but I've never had a problem with the board shutting off while moving.



  • @WyvernKing That's exactly what I think is happening to me as well. I'm probably lifting my toe to readjust when I'm standing still, and the board goes into dismount mode. Luckily this doesn't happen when you're going over .5mph or I'd probably be nosediving a lot.



  • I think many of these issues are solved by riding with the sensor on the back foot rather than the front. When your foot loses sensor contact, most of the time it's the front foot, whereas my rear foot stays glued to the board.



  • dshack, I've been experimenting with your idea of keeping the sensor foot on the back and I have so say it seems you are correct, that the back foot keeps better contact over the widest range of moves and conditions. Its a little weird because when starting out you tilt back then head the other way, but that's a small thing if it puts this issue to bed once and for all as it seems like it might, so I think I'm going to start teaching the new people to use the back foot instead. For me, however, unfortunately I think its too late to change, everything's unconscious with me now so not sure I can see starting over...



  • @SeaP90d Yeah I was watching some of the footage from my last video and on the closeup shots I did with the selfie stick, I noticed my front heel comes off the board completely a lot when I ride. Luckily as long as one is on the sensor, I'm okay.



  • @SeaP90d Tilt back? I mount by doing the following:

    • Put footpads at rear of board.
    • Place right foot (I ride regular) on footpad to engage.
    • Place left foot on the other side and stand up

    I don't think I've noticed any backwards tilting or motion; I can generally just get up and go.



  • Thanks dshack, I can't believe I never figured out you can start out planting your sensor pad foot first and leveling with your other foot, I guess I assumed it would want to squirt away or something if you step on the sensor side first. So there you have it, one more reason to think about getting used to riding with the sensor pad in the back...



  • Hello everybody !
    Is someone can explain me why the sensors are working during the cruise ?

    If the sensor would switch off over 2 miles/h for instance, it will avoid the unexpected nosedives, not?

    Thanks



  • @jllasseri Once you're moving over .5mph (that's POINT five), you only have to have one of the 2 sensors covered. This is to allow a little unintentional foot movement.

    But if you uncover both while riding, the board stops. Otherwise, if you fell off the board, it would keep flying along until it smashed into something.



  • @thegreck you're right. It's probably the reason why we need to sensors working differently according the speed. not ?



  • @jllasseri Exactly. To dismount, you just have take your foot off on one of the 2 sensors, but only when you're stopped. Once you're riding, though you can take your foot off one sensor without anything happening, to allow for accidental foot movement.



  • @thegreck sorry when talked about 2 sensors I meant when for each foot



  • @jllasseri sorry when I spoke about 2 sensors I meant one for each foot


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