Thrown off after nosedive with no pushback warning (nose dive, nose-dive)



  • @bmtka Oh, sorry... I meant inertia, not entropy! I had to re-read my post to even believe I had said that.



  • I'm scared to get back on the board at least on pavement cause no pushback warning and I've been thrown down twice now on pavement and the company told me to send the board back and they would test it...cost me $53 to ship and they maintain nothing wrong with it. Lots of us are getting thrown off forward for some reason and the company seems to be stonewalling re: reason. I'm an old guy and I've been on crutches due to this.



  • @Kwok That's the answer...attach a couple of small wheels to the front to counter nose dive. I can bloody well do that. As soon as I get off my crutches I will give it a try.



  • @powder Just follow my advice (keep your center of gravity over the wheel, and concentrate on not putting your weight on the front footpad) and you should be fine. Even if you roll over something unexpected that causes the nose to suddenly go down, if you're balanced, you should be able to run it out instead of falling on your face.

    This isn't just something I made up... it's the physics of how the OneWheel works; plus it's how every advanced rider who never nosedives rides their OneWheel.



  • Thanks...will try harder to balance front to back. The times I nosed it were when I was trying to accelerate out of a dip in the pavement and I leaned forward when the board slowed too much.



  • @powder said:

    Thanks...will try harder to balance front to back. The times I nosed it were when I was trying to accelerate out of a dip in the pavement and I leaned forward when the board slowed too much.

    There you go. Stay centered and it's just a matter of leveling the board with your feet, not with the weight of your body. When the board is tilted forward, the wheel will speed up to try and get ahead of you to level it, but if your weight is on the front of the board, instead of getting ahead of you, IT LAUNCHES YOU.



  • @thegreck

    Great advice.


  • Banned

    I'd have to agree it seems that this should not be happening. I feel it's a design or electric program flaw. I also think the concept of it cutting out upon minimal feet adjustment is bad. I mean your feet are constantly shifting and moving a bit during riding, especially on all terrain. So the boards just going to cut out on you as soon as you go over a bump that causes your foot to move or raise a bit?

    This seems like a concern which is happening to almost everyone and while falling doing a sport like snowboarding is expected I can't imagine anyone wants to unexpectedly smash their face into the concrete and possibly avert death at any given random moment regardless of skill.



  • @poopmonkey Try Googling "Segway Fails" and then tell me that the OneWheel is the only self-balancing vehicle that fails if you put too much weight on the front.

    The OneWheel's design is amazing, and the electronics are stellar. The only people complaining of nose dives are either people who have never ridden one, or beginners who don't quite have the hang of it yet and haven't fully grasped the limitations of a single-wheeled self-balancing device. I've been riding for 3 months; I ride it to and from work, I ride it on the weekends, I ride it every chance I get... and I've never had a nosedive-related wreck.

    You just have to stay centered and keep your balance when you ride, plain and simple. Same as on a skateboard. Same as with any board sport. People who surf or skate or ride a snowboard have to LEARN how to do it. And they fall off a lot while they're learning. This isn't a design flaw, it's life.

    If you want to ride around on a self-balancing unicycle and look like a wanker because you think it's safer, that's up to you. The rest of us understand the danger involved in this sport and we face it head-on, because it's worth it.



  • @thegreck said:

    @poopmonkey Try Googling "Segway Fails" and then tell me that the OneWheel is the only self-balancing vehicle that fails if you put too much weight on the front.

    The OneWheel's design is amazing, and the electronics are stellar. The only people complaining of nose dives are either people who have never ridden one, or beginners who don't quite have the hang of it yet and haven't fully grasped the limitations of a single-wheeled self-balancing device. I've been riding for 3 months; I ride it to and from work, I ride it on the weekends, I ride it every chance I get... and I've never had a nosedive-related wreck.

    You just have to stay centered and keep your balance when you ride, plain and simple. Same as on a skateboard. Same as with any board sport. People who surf or skate or ride a snowboard have to LEARN how to do it. And they fall off a lot while they're learning. This isn't a design flaw, it's life.

    If you want to ride around on a self-balancing unicycle and look like a wanker because you think it's safer, that's up to you. The rest of us understand the danger involved in this sport and we face it head-on, because it's worth it.

    I could not have said it better myself !!


  • Banned

    @thegreck I feel you I'm just commenting on the video he posted it doesn't look like he did anything wrong albeit in a video it's hard to tell.



  • Well said, thegreck, the only thing I'd add is it that it's happened once (but only once) to everyone here, and although we haven't definitively figured it out, it seems to be some combination of using the "classic" mode, going up hill, and we're thinking a barely perceptible bit of heel lift. One thing that seems to happen with everyone who's had this happen and then gets more experience is that in addition to no more classic mode, they perfect a loose ankle stance that keeps their feet soles firmly planted to the deck regardless of the board/body angle.



  • @SeaP90d Totally agree! I think they should get rid of Classic shaping because it just seems dangerous!

    Luckily, I was reading the forums for 2 months while I waited for my board to arrive (those were the days!), and had already read many horror stories about Classic mode, so to this day I've never ridden in anything but Extreme.

    Eliminating Classic mode, every board sport that's worth a damn has a learning curve, and they all have an element of risk. Without it, where would the fun be? Most surfers at some point have been gashed by their fins, but you'll never see them removing them.



  • @SeaP90d You are right on about classic mode. But I wish you were right about the "only once" part. :) Took me several face-meets-asphalt before I moved out of classic. All good since then.

    @thegreck It has taken me a while to fully understand your point about remaining centered over the board and using your feet (not weight shift) to change the angle of the board to accelerate/decelerate. I think its an important point that probably gets missed. When I am not carving, its relatively straight forward to accelerate/decelerate without shifting my weight. But, when carving aggressively, I find that I have to resist the temptation to shift my weight forward through a carving-turn.

    (warning to OWers who also surf: the instinct to lean forward to generate speed by using the ramp of the wave is a quick ticket to the asphalt on a OW. OW riding can feel "surfy" sometimes but using the same instinctive moves that we use surfing will cause impact.)



  • @DavidJohn this happened to me too. I was starting up a small hill with a slight incline. I leaned forward to accelerate and the wheel locked up on me and fell forward landing on my shoulder. When I got up I tried to rotate the tire but couldn't. It was locked up so I turned to power off and back on again and tire was able to rotate. I think I just need to not lean forward as much to accelerate, especially starting up an incline. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks



  • @coryg The tire doesn't rotate freely when the Onewheel is powered on, that's normal (otherwise you'd start rolling when you tried to mount it). If you have trouble riding uphill without hitting the nose of the board on the ground, try switching to Elevated mode, which will automatically lift the nose a few inches to give you more clearance in hilly areas.



  • @smashdunk
    I wont ride in extreme anymore. They need to put pushback at 12 mph. Too dangerous



  • @wheeler no it is not dangerous. Don't accelerate too fast. Be patient and let the machine work the way it is intended. The classic modes push black is WAY more dangerous cause I always went past it. Then felt like was losing control. But I learned to let the board rebalance on its own.



  • I can understand if FM doesn't want to give rider's access to OWs sensor logs. But I would feel better knowing that logs were being collected for analysis by FM as the user-base grows and ride-miles accumulate. Many apps ask if logs can be transmitted back to HQ for analysis and I usually couldn't care less. This sounds like one app where the user-base would be really happy for their ride logs to be used to improve the experience.



  • @Subterfuge and everyone else that this happened to -

    I created an app for Android that will log all the stats to a file, it should help us get to the bottom of this. It's at https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.kwatts.powtools

    Added stats include the sensor pads that are engaged and tilt/yaw/etc of the onewheel, current amps, etc. The app also displays all of these in one screen (and has buttons to set the ride mode and lights). I was riding and logging the other day and got the nosedive, stats showed going around 7 mph and both pads not engaged, although there wasn't a big spike in amps. Not enough data yet to figure out what is going on, but something is.


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