OW front sensor nosedive firmware fix



  • @jeff8v7 - to be honest on a few carves i felt like i lifted my heel up enough where it should've dropped me , so you could be right about it already being in the software .. in regards to the testing , i'll let someone else try that lol



  • There's 2 sensors, you need both covered to start and only 1 covered above .5 mph. If you fail to cover at least 1 while moving the board stops. Lol..



  • The sensors are also helpful for letting your board know it should not continue tearing down the block at 20 mph unridered.



  • Your solution can't work...simply because of you fall from the board or jump from it, it will continue to run away by itself until something put it at level or backward. it can be dangerous to let a 24lbs metal board running far from you at 15mph :P So it's safer the way it is :)



  • @Tartopom said in OW front sensor nosedive firmware fix:

    Your solution can't work...simply because of you fall from the board or jump from it, it will continue to run away by itself until something put it at level or backward. it can be dangerous to let a 24lbs metal board running far from you at 15mph :P So it's safer the way it is :)

    That could be solved by the lack of weight. The board will speed up dramaticly (just start it and let it freerun, and check the app, it will double the speed)



  • @jeff8v7 said in OW front sensor nosedive firmware fix:

    I vaguely remember someone mentioning this before. Perhaps it's already in the software?

    If us riders can imagine useful precautions like this, it hard to imagine the engineers didn't think of it too :)

    You could test it - put on some protection or ride in the grass and intentionally lift off your foot in the way you're worried about. See what happens...

    Oh trust me, you will fly off.. I had that a few times close to max speed, and my foot went of the sensor. Instant flying.



  • @BadWolf Lack of weight need to be detected....that's why sensors are there :o



  • The issue seems to happen most often with those >200lbs. It might be harder for you to notice blasting through pushback the heavier you are.



  • @Hubbitron Yes and No...i'm 113kg (220lbs) and I feel the pushback quite easily, also good advantage to be heavy is that usually you are also tall, so you have bigger feet (12US in my case) therefore I can easily cover the sensors and never had any novedive because of feet ripping or the sensors :P



  • @detroitwheelin

    you are right. other than 'nosedives' which are due to overweighting the nose, there is a problem with flaky 'sensors' disengaging and the subsequent 'crapout'. if you do not have flaky sensors then you may be unaware of this dangerous quality control issue.

    a firmware change that would alleviate the issue of being ignored by your board, would be a longer keep-alive after no sensor contact. this creates an issue of longer unmanned driving after a case of rider error (falling).

    the way the board should have been designed, and a good safety measure to prevent issues with flaky sensors is to have sensors for both feet.



  • We have two boards: 3xxx and 4xxx series. The latter one has slightly longer delay (maybe 100 ms) from sensor disengage to motor disengage. No problems with either of boards and I personally like the faster 3k-series. IMO: The other way around is a lot more dangerous. If the sensor wouldn't see you falling and the board would rush into other people.

    The disengage without purpose could be solved by using foot sensors on both pads.



  • @newtechsports

    i agree that the board driving unmanned can be more troublesome in certain situations--like a busy intersection or next to little kid or a beehive.

    consider this: would you rather have the board dive off a cliff after you safely bail out or, to slide off the cliff yourself with the board sitting there waiting for its next victim.



  • @mrb

    Has OneWheeling at the side of cliffs suddenly become a thing? :p



  • This post is deleted!


  • In 2010, Jimi Heselden, owner of Segway Inc., was killed when he drove over a cliff on a Segway., he was riding a path near the edge, and supposedly stopped to let a man and a dog pass, and reversed over the edge.



  • I'm at least 220, and I experienced regenerative pushback downhill today. I've also had it at low battery at about 4%. I've found if I go really slow I don't have the low battery pushback, so I can creep slowly at a speed where a fall wouldn't be dangerous anyway, and squeeze every bit out of the battery without pushback and stop at 1%. I ride elevated and the pushback seems very strong to me, I can't imagine trying to push through it, it feels extremely unstable when it happens and I need to get off immediately.

    I leave it in elevated at all times, and have no problem with it on flat areas, for me, elevated seems safest, and least likely to nosedive. It just feels conservative, like i'm ready to brake, and less likely to goof up and have my weight too far forward.



  • elevated

    w00t



  • @dalisdair said in OW front sensor nosedive firmware fix:

    In 2010, Jimi Heselden, owner of Segway Inc., was killed when he drove over a cliff on a Segway., he was riding a path near the edge, and supposedly stopped to let a man and a dog pass, and reversed over the edge.

    Not sure where you heard the part about letting a man and his dog pass, but everywhere I've seen this story they've said the specifics of his death are a mystery. His body and Segway were found in a river and there were no witnesses, so there's no telling how it happened exactly. Could've just had a heart attack while riding and gone out doing what he loved.



  • @thegreck

    Wikipedia. Man with dog is cited as a witness, and the part about letting them pass was conjecture by the Coroner, hopefully based on the account of the witness.