Pushback on the OW+ / Safety Limits / Top Speeds



  • @groovyruvy said in Pushback on the OW+ / Safety Limits / Top Speeds:

    @BrentWhitfield agreed that body weight, terrain, and rider aggressiveness contribute to the variability of nosedives. Other factors such as wind gusts and overbent knees can also play a role. I watched @kbern 's post and although you don't see it, you can hear the nosedive coming. You don't see it because he fights pushback really well and as a result the nose doesn't tilt back, but you can hear that sound from the motor, and that's the sound of the board telling you it's reached its max capacity (at which point you're essentially coasting). With more experience, it's that sound- and the accompanying feeling- that becomes the clue you're about to nosedive. I've been riding for 2 years and most of my painful nosedives happened during the first 6 months as I was becoming one with the board. I still nosedive on occasion, but now, most of the time I'm able to run it out. There's always a possibility there's a malfunction with the board, footpads, etc that triggers a nosedive, but most of the time it's 'rider error' and making that one small adjustment fixes it. As for why there's pushback, FM is limiting the top speed of board and pushback at a lower speed is the warning that you're approaching the limit. I like your idea of getting rid of pushback in favor of a rider warning, but there may be liability issues that are guiding FMs decisions, so they may prefer a more 'active braking' approach.

    Thanks for the detailed feedback. I went back to the video footage and listened with headphones and I can hear what you are talking about. I have a couple of questions for you. You mentioned that now that you know better, it still happens, but you are able to run it out. Is that because you are are hearing the noise, then slowing down before nosedive, or are you just able to get your legs moving because of the warning sound? I'm was hoping I could hear the noise and correct in time before failure/nosedive. In other words, I am wondering if once you hear the noise, can you lean back and slow down to avoid nose dive?



  • @brentwhitfield said in Pushback on the OW+ / Safety Limits / Top Speeds:

    In other words, I am wondering if once you hear the noise, can you lean back and slow down to avoid nose dive?

    exactly! The instant you hear the motor whining, back off a little and you should be fine. Ofcourse you cannot put your entire weight on the front and then expect to be in time :)



  • @brentwhitfield ditto what @Polle said.



  • @polle said in Pushback on the OW+ / Safety Limits / Top Speeds:

    @brentwhitfield said in Pushback on the OW+ / Safety Limits / Top Speeds:

    In other words, I am wondering if once you hear the noise, can you lean back and slow down to avoid nose dive?

    exactly! The instant you hear the motor whining, back off a little and you should be fine. Ofcourse you cannot put your entire weight on the front and then expect to be in time :)

    Thanks @Polie @groovyruvy for your insightful comments. Regarding "just cruising" at greater than 15.5 MPH. Before I had my nose dive, I cruised all the time on smooth/flat conditions at 19.5-20.5 mph. (I weigh 162 lbs) Is it pretty safe to say that hitting nose dive inducing board "limits" is probably more likely when going uphill or incline rather than downhill or flat terrain? Put another way, is the board safer (less likely to nose dive) at > 15.5 mph speeds when on flat ground or downhill? I'm just trying to get a sense of what may trigger another "board limit" induced nose dive so I can avoid it. LOL Thanks, again.



  • @brentwhitfield
    The Faster you go, or the steeper you are climbing, the board is using more of the capable energy, so there will be less energy available to keep you balanced



  • @Polle agreed. @BrentWhitfield I agree, you're least likely to nose dive while going downhill, and more likely to nose dive while going up an incline. Nose dives on flat ground can and do certainly occur, but I feel they're more easy to prevent / predict / recover from as compared to uphill riding. Uphill on the OW can be a tricky thing when you're first starting out. Even after I got past the 'introduction' stage, I continued to occasionally nose dive while riding uphill, and it surprised me- I had no idea it was coming and I wiped out. But after giving it some thought, it made sense- you move the OW by leaning forward / putting pressure on the front footpad, and when you do that while riding uphill, the road gets much closer to the nose of your board (as compared to riding on level ground) due to the incline (the steeper the grade, the more dicey it can get). So the trick is to find that sweet spot where you're able to generate enough forward momentum to make it up the hill, while at the same time not pushing too hard to the point that you jam the nose into the hill. With a little practice this becomes second nature. On really steep hills, I sometimes do switchbacks / ride zig-zag sideways up the hill- a good way to tackle steep grades and avoid nose dives.



  • I've been riding for almost 2 months and am coming up on 250 miles. Had a couple of wipe-outs earlier on, but looking back it was rider error and I had been wearing full pads so didn't really get hurt. I've been taking the board on commutes for about a month and a half. I ride in mission and have always respected the pushback which comes on around 16 mph and never pushing past it. For the past couple of weeks, I got really comfortable and stopped wearing the pads and only kept the helmet, boy was that a mistake. I was riding out to lunch yesterday, on the side walk, up a slight incline. I was accelerating to my normal speed, probably around 15-16 mph, and without warning the front dropped which sent me flying and I landed on my elbows. I was not wearing elbow pads/wrist guards so am left with nasty scrapes on my elbows and hands. I guess the lesson learned here is to always wear protective pads no matter how comfortable you get. But the disconcerting thing is I have been expecting the board to give pushback before nosedives, so I was not prepared for the nosedive at all.



  • @magrider you and I learned the same lesson - always wear pads! It's fate that the one time you're not wearing them you wipe out. I haven't had a nasty fall for over a year but I still pad up for every ride. I feel a lot more confident with the gear on because I'm not worried about injuring myself if I fall. About your nosedive, usually but not always you get pushback first, so when I ride I try to be mindful of the 'feel' (level) of the board because sometimes that pushback doesn't come when you might expect it.



  • @magrider Same lesson. As soon as I stoped wearing pads, I wiped out out of the blue and had 2 weeks of recovery with skin growing back over all the wounds.
    I am back to wearing all the protection I had originally despite the fact, I am very comfortable ridding the board.



  • Yes. Exactly the same thing just happened to me in mission in my V2. No pushback, just quit. No more Mission mode for me.



  • surely with all the technology the ability to just drop it back on its tail is way better then what happen at 20 mph off the front nose dive board into traffic running around with no one on it. I have tons of road rash and bruised hip because of this method that was not really a smart plan.


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