Carveability on Gemini App



  • I thought turning was accomplished by leaning and using the edge of the wheel. So, on the new Gemini app, how does the Carveability setting work? It does really seem to work, though.



  • @kylezg

    Easiest solution, try it.

    Carveability is like the "looseness" of the trucks on a skateboard. That setting changes how much heel or toe pressure you need to turn/carve. I personally would recommend just using Mission until you're comfortable on the board.



  • To be clear, I didn't mean to ask what's it like -- I know that. What I meant was, literally, how does it work? What is the setting doing to change the OneWheel's carveability, given that, as I understand it, turning is entirely physical process accomplished by leaning to use the edge of the wheel?



  • @kylezg I think it relates to how responsive the board is to lateral movement.



  • @kylezg the board is constantly trying to keep you from nose-diving. So when you lean into your board in say Sequoia, it immediately pushes back up at you making the ride more stiff and less responsive because even though you are trying to shift your weight—the board is doing everything it possibly can to keep you level. If you can’t shift your weight, you can’t turn as tight.

    Now, when you ride in say, Delirium, the board doesn’t attempt to keep you level as much as keep you from nosediving as late in your dip as possible. So the board let’s you push down farther before it tries to “catch” you. This makes the ride feel more fluid and allows you to throw your weight around more which makes it more responsive.

    The board can’t control your roll independently from your pitch. It affects your ability to roll (heal to toe) by stabilizing your pitch (front to rear).

    This is one of the reasons why Delirium drains battery far faster than other ride shaping. The motor has to kick in much harder, much later, to keep you from contacting the ground. That requires a surge of energy that batteries just don’t cope with well. It’s far more efficient to keep the board level with more steady, incremental power increases than to give you the freedom to push and have to catch you at the very last possible moment before failure.

    It’s the difference between hanging on a pull-up bar by two hands and falling from a tree while trying to grab a branch with your two hands to stop your fall.

    Hope this helps explain how ride shaping and “carvability” works.



  • @eckit said in Carveability on Gemini App:

    The board can’t control your roll independently from your pitch. It affects your ability to roll (heal to toe) by stabilizing your pitch (front to rear).

    This is something I've puzzled over for a while but it makes sense. Your comment was very informative but I will disagree a little about what (it feels to me like) Delirium is doing and why that affects the battery more, though it's very possible I am misreading your comment and you meant strictly in comparison to Sequoia.

    For my comparison I'll use Mission and Delirium because those are the two modes I am most familiar with.

    To me, Delirium is much quicker to correct the rider once it senses you are out of "true" or level - that is, it is more aggressive and "tighter", and will not let you dip down as low as Mission will - Mission will let you push things out of "true" or level farther before it brings you back in - and you will frequently bring it back in yourself, because you are now carving the opposite way. That's what gives it that loose, floaty feeling on pavement (and also, why some suspect that a nosedive may be slightly easier to achieve in Mission - the safety margins are thinner, because the board lets you get farther from level before it reels you back in).

    To me, this explains why Delirium is much more stable and easier to ride on uneven ground or grass, while Mission is much harder to ride on uneven ground or grass, and why Delirium eats more battery - because it is correcting the rider sooner, more frequently, and harder.



  • Oh yeah loose and less pressure needed to push down...i found that out after my fall and that was not how i wanted to learn!



  • @eckit great explanation. May I add that (I'm totally guessing here) carvability setting affects turning by increasing the speed of the gyros in the wheel. Try this, Hold a bicycle wheel by the axle(one hand on each side)and tilt side to side, then have someone spin the wheel and while the wheel is spinning tilt side to side again and you can feel how the wheel spinning makes it harder to tilt or how the wheel wants to stay upright. So lower carvbility setting makes it easier to tilt side to side. But keep in mind that I'm just a guy who is probably at around a 60% success rate when it comes to being right about sh&@/.



  • @snosurfer That's best guess I have heard for changes in carveability. Interesting theory!



  • @kylezg said in Carveability on Gemini App:

    I thought turning was accomplished by leaning and using the edge of the wheel. So, on the new Gemini app, how does the Carveability setting work? It does really seem to work, though.

    While trying to understand how to execute a really sharp low speed turn I found what Bodhi Harrison said about digging the a corner into the ground really helpful. Here was the video. https://youtu.be/V4cyi-wZCPU?t=41

    His explanation worked for me. That it is not just bringing the the OW to the edge of the tire to turn, but to dip the front corner of the board into the turn. I think this is where loose vs tight comes into play. It would be hard to make a tight toe side turn if the board is tight and is fighting my effort to drive the toe side corner of the board close to the ground. Delirium allows me to more easily push the nose and tail down, so in turn it makes it easier to push the front toe side corner to the ground when turning. Same is true for heel side. So the looseness of the front and rear translates to how easy it is to dip the leading corner into a turn, thus giving the feeling of a more carvey board.



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