Wrecked at 0 Miles.



  • @Zocchi , so sorry to hear of your injury!

    Do heal up and give it another try. While you are recovering, watch some YouTube videos of others riding or teaching. Some of my favorites, for good coaching, include:

    When watching trail videos (my personal favorites), I often turn off all audio and concentrate on the rider's bio-mechanics: stance/foot position, use of hips/shoulders, balance techniques, relative height over the board, de-weighting techniques, etc. While watching, I ask myself: "Can I feel in my body what that looks like it feels like?

    Best to you as you recover and welcome to the Community!



  • alt text



  • Ouch! So sorry!



  • @Zocchi said in Wrecked at 0 Miles.:

    Boy, oh boy, do I wish I had actually taken the time to learn how to use this thing.

    Count on just slowly putting around for the first 40 miles at a minimum. Short progress can be very misleading.

    I started out on the front lawn just doing lazy laps and figure eights. Your feet are basically useless blocks of meat for the first ten miles imo. At first, you may have very little stamina and the sensations are meaningless, which is a recipe for falling. After a while you become way more comfortable just standing on the board let alone interpreting the sensations your feet are telling you. You may even be able to carve on the flats ok, but an uneven road surface will substantially alter the sensation, and there is a surprising amount of that type of situational experience to acquire while riding these things.

    Hard heel-side turns require a degree of trust in the board as well as a strong sense of balance (you're basically performing your own trust fall). I was legit intimidated by it for the first 20 miles and I'm a well-seasoned snowboarder. A complete novice would be smart to just take it REALLY slow. Wear all the gear. Never stop wearing a helmet imo.

    After you master the lawn, driveway or parking lot, then try a road or sidewalk. Traversing inclines can be kinda trippy. Just my two cents on the subject.



  • @Zocchi
    Sumo wrestler foot! Ice that down and get better soon.



  • I stepped on a onewheel first time ever in July '19. Rode in my yard for 3 days slowly, total of 8 miles. Took it on the street the 4th day. It was so much harder to ride in the grass and it prepared me for the street.

    With that said my suggestion is ride in the yard, flat mowed grass if possible for a couple days. When you get back to the street it will seem like a breeze. Go slow and let your brain/body adapt to what your doing. Plus when you fall it's much easier on your board and body. Have fun.



  • @Senior-Coffee said in Wrecked at 0 Miles.:

    I stepped on a onewheel first time ever in July '19. Rode in my yard for 3 days slowly, total of 8 miles. Took it on the street the 4th day. It was so much harder to ride in the grass and it prepared me for the street.

    same here for me, almost exactly. i think i rode my first 10-20 miles on grass, though. after my first 3 days or so on the grass, i got brave and decided to ride home. once i hit the street, i was amazed at how smooth and easy it was. i think riding on uneven grassy surfaces helps you condition your stabilizer muscles faster, and get used to responding to unexpected bumps and knocks one way or the other.



  • @Franko said in Wrecked at 0 Miles.:

    same here for me, almost exactly. i think i rode my first 10-20 miles on grass, though. after my first 3 days or so on the grass, i got brave and decided to ride home. once i hit the street, i was amazed at how smooth and easy it was. i think riding on uneven grassy surfaces helps you condition your stabilizer muscles faster, and get used to responding to unexpected bumps and knocks one way or the other.

    Yup same here. I agree. Starting on a lawn has benefits. Riding pavement has a certain 'squirreliness' to it that can be challenging. I came from almost exclusively a snowboarding background. It helped a lot since almost all of those skills translate nicely to Onewheeling. I regularly catch myself 'pumping' my onewheel while riding dips on flat terrain, and it's purely by habit.

    One notion that does NOT translate is the concept and practice of 'edge control'. On a snowboard, you're always controlling your edges in some fashion. Onewheel's ride 'flat' by comparison (cuz it's a wheel). If your curling your toes with a death grip trying to hold an edge while on a onewheel, you're probably doing it wrong.



  • @NotSure said in Wrecked at 0 Miles.:

    One notion that does NOT translate is the concept and practice of 'edge control'. On a snowboard, you're always controlling your edges in some fashion. Onewheel's ride 'flat' by comparison (cuz it's a wheel).

    fellow snowboarder here, and yeah, i agree. carving works a similar feel and muscles, but you definitely don't want to work front and back "edges" on a OW like you do on a snowboard. that would be asking for trouble, i think, haha.



  • @Franko said in Wrecked at 0 Miles.:

    i think, haha.

    almost tried a backside stop my first time riding down a slight hill. Still feels a little strange sometimes.


Log in to reply