Optimum deceleration



  • How would you all describe the deceleration profile of the onewheel with regard to slope and how to best utilize regenerative braking?

    To me it seems that steeper slopes don't always result in greater regen.

    I also notice that traversing downhill at speed can sometimes be trickier than travelling uphill at the same rate.

    Gentler longer inclines appear to use less power than steeper shorter inclines.

    I try to use the motor hum as the means of determining how close I am to overpowering the unit.



  • @NotSure
    As a heavier rider, I totally rely on e-drive feedback for acceleration and deceleration. I also concur that the grade of hill makes a huge change in what to expect from the drive unit. Surges are also my check point for backing off when loading the drive. Unfortunately that surge does not happen on deceleration and you just get a cut out and tail slide / ride effect. I had this happen at an intersection once and luckily rode out the slide....



  • @NotSure said in Optimum deceleration:

    To me it seems that steeper slopes don't always result in greater regen.

    Some streets I ride are pretty steep for being paved roads, and when transitioning from one to another i have to really remind myself it's not a snowboard.

    I feels like i can't just bomb hills because the shape of the eye of that regen braking/deceleration needle isn't easily described (Does that make sense?).

    The steeper the hill the quicker that deceleration force maxes out. So what is the max vertical speed the onewheel will permit on a 15-20% grade vs 5-10% grade?



  • When the tail starts to drag it feels like the deceleration is slower, but that could just be a weight transfer change.

    With steeper slopes, the tail drags easier AND greater breaking force is required. I've been caught out a few times tail dragging past the point I wanted to stop. 😅 Funny as long as there isn't a cliff edge.



  • @stinkyface said in Optimum deceleration:

    With steeper slopes, the tail drags easier AND greater breaking force is required. I've been caught out a few times tail dragging past the point I wanted to stop. 😅 Funny as long as there isn't a cliff edge.

    So was that because the motor cut out and you coasted to a stop, or because the slope was so steep the tail was dragging the whole way down, or are you bombing down those hills fast enough that the braking mechanism struggles to slow you quickly, resulting in a sluggish timely braking process (like a train)?

    What I'm really trying to figure out is how fast and how hard I can safely ride my pint on the hills where I live? I'd like to be able to transition from a comfortable 12 mph cruising speed on flat land to a similar speed down a 15% grade if possible (like on my snowboard). A similar uphill jaunt would be understandably slower, but downhill always seems just as slow, and I'm trying to figure out if it's a legitimate design limitation or just my technique or lack thereof.



  • @NotSure said in Optimum deceleration:

    So was that because the motor cut out and you coasted to a stop, or because the slope was so steep the tail was dragging the whole way down, or are you bombing down those hills fast enough...

    No motor wasn't cut out. I'm definitely not the daredevil type either. I think it's really important to know the limits of the machine, particularly braking in an emergency. Testing it in a safe place teaches you the distance you can stop in safely or when to bail early when a car or dog jumps in your way.

    The Regent brake on a OW is pretty good, but it is a limitation when going down a steep hill as the brake strength is based on the board angle. If the angle is maxed out with the tail dragging on a steep downhill, the braking isn't as effective as braking on flat where the board will lean back at a greater angle. Then it also has to deal with the gravity trying to speed you up. Less braking plus gravity equals longer brake distance.

    On a steep hill it's pretty easy to drag the tail.
    I've tried a hill that was so steep the thing didn't brake at all, because the tail couldn't go below the normal level angle. I wonder if the hill angle was so steep the tail is pitched higher than the nose, would it actually accelerate you down the hill??

    You should test and practice emergency braking on a downhill slope if you don't already. 👌

    Sorry got a bit wordy there...



  • @stinkyface said in Optimum deceleration:

    I wonder if the hill angle was so steep the tail is pitched higher than the nose, would it actually accelerate you down the hill??

    yeah this is exactly what I'm trying to figure out. I imagine pushback creeps in there somewhere. Does it happen at slow speed to compensate for the slope, or at the same relative top speed and it's the brake rate/distance that increases?